Home » Revisiting effects of contextual strength on the subordinate bias effect: Evidence from eye movements. by Jorie Megan Colbert
Revisiting effects of contextual strength on the subordinate bias effect: Evidence from eye movements. Jorie Megan Colbert

Revisiting effects of contextual strength on the subordinate bias effect: Evidence from eye movements.

Jorie Megan Colbert

Published
ISBN : 9780549600589
NOOKstudy eTextbook
89 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Results of eye movement studies have consistently shown that when context preceding a biased ambiguous word is either neutral or instantiates the words dominant meaning, fixation durations on the ambiguous word are comparable to those on a controlMoreResults of eye movement studies have consistently shown that when context preceding a biased ambiguous word is either neutral or instantiates the words dominant meaning, fixation durations on the ambiguous word are comparable to those on a control word that has been matched for length and frequency. However, when context preceding the ambiguous word instantiates the subordinate meaning, fixation durations on the ambiguous word are longer than on a control word- this phenomenon has been called the subordinate bias effect. The goal of the proposed study was to test the reordered access models assumption that very strong context can eliminate the subordinate bias effect. Specifically, participants read passages with (1) no references to the subordinate meaning (neutral condition), in which the dominant meaning will be accessed first, (2) one reference (nonelaboration condition), in which both meanings will be accessed and (3) four references (full elaboration condition), in which the subordinate meaning may be accessed before the dominant meaning. A related issue of interest for this study is what happens upon a subsequent mention of the ambiguous word. The reordered access model assumes that the unselected meaning is unaffected by activation of the context-appropriate meaning. To test this assumption, Experiment 2s materials presented the ambiguous word a second time and investigated access of the dominant meaning. In this study the subordinate bias effect was observed in the nonelaboration condition and eliminated in the full elaboration condition for the first mention of the ambiguous word. Additionally, in Experiment 2 participants had difficulty accessing the dominant meaning upon reading the second mention of the ambiguous word in the full elaboration condition (i.e., dominant bias effect). The results of the current study have implications for models of lexical access and more broadly, language processing theories. To account for the result of current study, I argue that a passive automatic memory retrieval mechanism (e.g., resonance) underlies the reordered access model.